Genn Talks About The Life of A Journalist

28.10.14

Author, journalist, Press Club of Long Island awardee, devoted wife and mom of two; there isn’t much that the talented Adina Genn hasn’t already accomplished. Genn, who originally wanted to be a writer, recently offered Hofstra students some valuable insights into the life and daily struggles of a working journalist in today’s economy.

While Genn now admits she was clueless of her career path once finishing college, her first job was with an academic book publishing company. From there on out, she then began to work as a freelancer and soon as a stringer, covering business meetings which she says helped her build connections and meet people in the industry who would later prove valuable. Genn then had a short stint with Long Island Business News, a local online and print newspaper, where she put her business background to use. However, for the past four and a half years Genn has worked with the hyper local newspaper: the Long Island Patch and watched it grow and evolve. She recalls how the Patch, who once had over forty employees, now do the same job with four employees and still manage to cover twelve areas on Long Island, of which she herself covers Huntington, Northport and Port Washington – the last being her hometown.

With regard to the changing nature of journalism, Genn says that her work nowadays consists largely of aggregating stories rather than doing actual fieldwork as it’s no longer practically feasible to do so, in fact it even provides a certain advantage wherein she can gather information without the necessity of traveling and being present at locations. She also cites social media as a major source of information for obtaining tips on potential stories.

On the subject of advice to young journalists starting out, Genn states that the skillsets learned in the field are “amazing and transferable” to any other field of one’s choosing. For those who are inclined towards the public relations field, Genn affirms that it’s always helpful to be able to prepare succinct press releases, which make it easier for journalists to use in their reports. Overall the talk proved to be very inspirational and provided students with an accurate depiction of the life of a journalist.

Hofstra University Women’s Golf at St. Andrews

The Hofstra women’s golf team had a challenging week at the Jack Nicklaus designed golf course, The Saint Andrews Golf Club (Ardsley, NY). As the founding member of the U.S.G.A. (the governing body of golf in the U.S.), The Saint Andrews Golf Club is a very prestigious club, first established in 1888 and holds the record as the oldest in the country.
The Pride finished tied 7th with Hartford in the 36-hole event hosted by St. John’s University with a two-day total score of 346. Andrea Nelson, a sophomore who came in tied 9th individually with rounds of 78 and 79 on the Par 71 course, had the best score on the team for the week. The team had a rough two days playing in windy conditions and battling unusually quick and sloped greens.
On being asked about the tournament, sophomore Victoria Snak, the best player for 2013-2014, said, “I could have played better, but the conditions were incredibly windy and the course was playing more difficult than it already was. I shot 89, 84, but was happy with my short game and overall feel like Rutgers will be better. Plus, it was really great to play Saint Andrew’s as it’s the oldest course in the United States.” Other team members who competed in the tournament include sophomores Jacquie Faldetta and Jai Ghuman as well as freshmen Amanda Bigger and Shannon Haselton. Follow H.U.G. this week at Rutgers on October 10th and 11th at http://www.gohofstra.com/SportSelect.dbml?&DB_OEM_ID=22200&SPID=13579&SPSID=109558

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